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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,309 (some duplicates have been removed)
rights movement. to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. i am proud to stand before you as the first african-american, first woman city administrator. >> [applause] >>thank you. i i am grateful to be inspired and mentored by many great civil rights leaders and my educational leaders which includes usf law school. >> [applause] >> and my family members who have mentored me and have paved the way for me along my career path. i could not have gotten there without them. my greatest inspirations are my parents william little and maria little, and i my greatest inspirations are my parents william little and maria little, and i want to talk about howthey were inspired by the march on washington and dr. king's speech which subsequently has passed on to me. my mother was among the 200,000 people who joined dr. martin they were inspired by the march on washington and dr. king's speech which subsequently has passed on to me. my mother was among the 200,000 people who joined dr. martin luther king on the march on washington 50 years ago and stood up for the rights for freedom.
reporting. >>> also tonight, 50 years after the march on washington, old warriors and a new generation unite to consider the long path of progress and the road ahead. this is the 900-page document we call obamacare. it could change costs, coverage, and pretty much all of healthcare in america. my show sorts this all out. in fact, my staff has read the entire thing. which is probably more than what most members of congress can claim. we'll separate politics from policy, and just prescribe the facts. >> caller: the water -- it requires this new warning. >> the pressure tonight continues to build on syria as other nations demand an investigation into suspicions of a chemical weapons attack. you've seen those gruesome pictures that show hundreds of dead men, women and children and they have raised alarm. while other violence have claimed many more lives and many more made homeless. >>> the united nations reports that child refugees have reached 1 million and satellite images of the az zaaingstari refugee camp. >> the united nations says over half the syrian refugees in jordan are under the age o
the anniversary of the "i have a dream" speech and the famous march on washington. that pivotal moment in history signaled a turning point in the nation's civil right movement with a quarter of million people marming for equal rights. as it was back then, many are getting set now to speak out on dr. king's dream. and the movement. the march begins shortly down independence avenue, passing the new martin luther king memorial and winds up at the washington monument. that is where doug mckelway is standing by on what is a gorgeous day in our nation's capital city. hi, doug. >> it is a gorgeous day. a spectacular day for the event today. the march on washington in 1963 was the single largest gathering of people in washington up until that time. i'll let the ambulance pass by here. join me as i step on the curb here. all right. there we go. there have been largeer crowds sincebe that day but up until that time it was the largest crowd. the national park service stopped measuring crowd size since the million man march because they were criticized to overestimate size crowd by some groups and underestim
, is to follow the efforts in washington today to present all of the options. >> so you do believe there would have to be a man date first from an international body? >> that's what he has said. if he can't get the united neighborhoods there are other man datas he could look for. >> is at this point all hope for diplomatic solution lost. >> it's very hard to see a diplomatic solution. the opposition has dis united. the government made up its mind to crush the rebellions and uprisings that were occurring around at a time country. it's going to be very hard to get people negotiating for a solution. >> all right. ambassador richard murphy, we thank you so much for coming in this morning. >> pleasure. >>> it's shaping up to be a beautiful morning across the northeast. high pressure is in control. and we continue to deal with nothing but sunshine. take a look. hard to find anything here on the radar. clear skies. we did have a cold front push through earlier on the week. luckily, now, the skies are shaping up. it's going to be a gorgeous day temperaturewise, nice and comfortable. in albany, 76. new
king, jr.'s, famous, i have a dream speech in washington. >> more people there than i have ever seen in one place in my entire life. >> hear from a bay area woman who attended that historic march and how she and others are commemorating king's legacy. >> vendors supplying your produce, fighting for space. no more. the new plan to bring them all under one roof. >> it is back. a chance a authority back in the forecast. we'll pinpoint the location as the news continues right here on the cw. ,,,,,,,,,,,,,, washington today, to commeme >>> tens of thousands of people packed the national mall in washington today to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the historic march on washington for civil rights. family members of reverend martin luther king, jr., delivered his famous, i have a dream speech at the march led today's event along with other civil rights leaders. >> this is not the time for a commemoration, nor is this the time for self-congratulations celebration. the task is not done. the journey is not complete. >> some of those in the crowd had attended the march 50 years ago, the
decades ago in front of majestic lincoln memorial in washington dc. the march on washington was an assemblage of people in power converging on washington dc, our nations capital, only occasionally seen every few decades. a quarter of 1 million americans march on washington that hot summer day. each representing thousands and thousands of americans were standing up for both racial equality and job opportunities. across the nation. now i will defer to our main speaker, the man who is there and whose words you will soon hear them up but this was the largest public gathering in washington dc until that time in our nations history. only surpassed by some of the antiwar marches that followed later in the 60s. african-americans, teachers, students, union workers, 30 of all creeds and people of many walks of life, came together to appeal to the conscience of the nation and demand action that would enable the patient to live up to our constitutional ideals. that would free african-americans from the shackles of poverty and discrimination and free all of us from the reality of segrega
. seven blacks and six whites left washington, d.c. on two buses they headed south. at first, only minor hostility greeted them. but when one bus arrived in birmingham alabama, a mob surrounded them and beat the freedom fighters. >> i was on the greyhound, that was the bus they set on fire. burned it. and we would have all burned to death had it not been for the fact that one of the fuel tanks of the bus exploded, scared the hell out of the mob. >> reporter: that ride ended abruptly and the riders feared the violence would snuff out the movement. the first ride was not the last. students willing to face death picked up the cause boarding buses heading south. in his san francisco home, frank nelson shares his story with blankenhide. nelson took his first ride in june, by then the movement had spread to trains. >> they got off the train and headed to the homes that were right there. the black riders went into the whites homes and they were carted off to jail. >> reporter: nelson was 23 when his body was bruised and beaten. >> friend, i'm a mississippi segragist and i'm proud of it. >> repo
our march on washington conversation series, as a father and son reflect on what that event has young people were found with courage and some often radical symptoms, i wouldn't have the >> ifill: and we close with the story of army staff sergeant ty michael carter, who received the nation's highest military honor today for his bravery druing the war on afghanistan. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the united states insisted today it is "undeniable" that syria's rulers gassed their own people last week, just outside damascus. that was coupled with new warnings of repercussions yet to opportun
and from her tenure as publisher and ceo and chair of the board of "the washington post" company. mrs. graham was at the helm of "the washington post" during that era of the pentagon papers and watergatwatergat e. in august of 2013 "the washington post" was sold to amazon founder jeffrey pesos. this is about one hour. c-span: katharine graham, author of "personal history," did your children learn anything from this book about you? >> guest: that's a hard question. i'm sure they probably did, but i couldn't tell you exactly what. c-span: all the stuff in here about your early life and your husband and all that, did they know that? have you-all talked that out? >> guest: yes, i think they understand that he was ill. they--the oldest one was 20, and the youngest one was 11, so they had to deal with it then and always. c-span: the question i had after i read the book was, 'why do you want us to know all this?' >> guest: i really don't suppose that i meant to just tell everything to everybody. but once i sat down to write my story, i just tend to be frank and open, and i wanted to be very
. but increasingly that free press has had quite a high price tag. >> the "washington post," the city's legendary yet struggling newspaper sold to one of the country's wealthiest men, amazon.com chairman jeff bezos. >> the "washington post" is is now owned by the head of amazon and its 14 print subscribers are already noticing one difference because the paper now comes in ludicrously wasteful packaging. but i will say they've made it much easier to return the news if you don't like it. still, this acquisition raises some big questions. first, how do you pronounce that guy's name? (pronouncing it differently n) i don't know. secondly, are you sure that this is a good investment? >> for 0 years the "washington post" has been owned by the grand family earning a reputation for top investigative journalism. but like most papers, it struggled over the past ten years. >> its circulation is half what it was in '93. >> it lost more than $50 million last year. >> john: oh, my god. i think i get it. this is just bezos' car wash. it's a front for a massive meth operation. say his name it's he euvment senbezos. s
, the struggles of yesterday, and as we're approaching the an vary of the march on washington we have to wonder if the goals of the march on washington were met over the past 50 years. the answer to that is no, they were not. we need people not only as young as my grandchildren, they're great kids, weren't they? not only kids as young as my grandchildren, but people as old as you and i are. we need to put our shoulders to the wheel, ge make sure the figt gets done. >> michael: i don't know what you meant by people as old as you and i, but thank you for coming. i really appreciate it. >>> i'm looking at you, john boehner, politicians are on summer break, and what better place than des moines, really? donnie fowler and my good friend ben mankiewicz will collectively shape their views on that with me. they'll also share them. and ro khama getting ready for the silicon valley house seat. and whether vacationing or campaigning, a book that every lawmaker should have on their summer reading list, a dream foreclosed. i'll talk to the author about the people she met and the courageous action they have
have a dream" speech at the lincoln memorial, and thousands today are gathering on the washington mall to celebrate that historic event. >>> we start in syria where the government is now accusing rebel forces of using chemical weapons. the claim comes as president obama meets with his national security team at the white house to talk about the reports of chemical weapons attacks by the syrian government. syrian state tv says soldiers found chemical weapons in tunnels used by rebels. cnn cannot confirm those claims or the authenticity of these images. the opposition claims government forces launched a nerve gas attack, killing hundreds of civilians. meanwhile a top u.n. official is in damascus today asking to investigate the alleged use of chemical weapons by the syrian government. president obama sat down with our chris kuomo earlier and he said the u.s. is still gathering information on the attack. >> what we've seen indicates that this is clearly a big event of grave concern. and we are already in communications with the entire international community. we're moving through the u.n. t
cord, tacoma washington. >> a short time okay t hamid karzi reacted to the bales' sentencing >> a life sentence to him or a death sentence to him will not bring back our children that he killed. if will not bring back the happiness of those families and will not replace the loss that the afghan nation suffered. >>> karzi also said he does not back capital punishment and asked that the u.s. provided compensation to the families of those killed. >>> the sentencing phase of the trial begins made for major nadal hassan. a military jury found him guilty of killing 13 fellow soldiers in 2009. hassan admitted to the murders in court and had no reaction on friday when the guilty verdict was red. the jury will now decide if he will be executed for his crimes or spend the rest of his life in prison. >>> washington state police are hunting for a teenager who is suspected of beating an 88-year-old world war ii veteran to death. another teenager is already in custody for the crime. police found the veteran in his car on wednesday with serious injuries. he died in the hospital yesterday. so far, police do no
for the washington measures i'm the person on that and for the drug purchasing proponent argument no one will be listed on that because we're not moving forward on the family friendly ordinance. let me see if there are are any thoughts on that increase seeing none, can i see a motion >> without objection it passes. and then on the undertook lying motion as amended can we do that same house, same call. without objection the motion is approved as amended >> madam clerk please read the memorials. >> on behalf of the supervisor campos for the late ms. alicia kerry. >> i want to thank you. this is the last board meeting before our august recess and i hope that everyone has a good recess and i want to thank the public and want to take a moment for sfgovtv and for the staff. and what that any more business for the committee >> no, that includes our business. >> with that madam clerk and everyone that includes our test test, test, test, test, test, test, test okay i'd like to call this meeting to order. hello. good afternoon, everyone thank you so much for coming to disaster council
in washington but first this report from jane ferguson. >> reporter: anti-military retestprotests in egypt has cha. they replace the demonstrations. here, around a thousand people gathered around the migathered . >> translator: i'm here to say no with an open chest. i know there are murders from the army and thugs with the police at any moment but i am standing here steadfast with us. >> reporter: the protests are daily now and they are noisy. they are in honor to protest and to avoid the serious crack downs. on tuesday, the anti-coup alliance says it has a new tactic to try to maintain. >> translator: the situation in this is tense what we do in each area and also depends on the curfew. there's demonstrations. every government has its own. some you will find -- the change in protests. >> reporter: the presidential candidate, the country called terrorism. that's the way those supporting the military-led government have been referring to those opposed to them. >> translator: issue needs to be raised. will anyone accept egypt to be a victim of a terrorism. this is the issue, egypt will not accep
think about the march on washington they only think about the dream speech and that part of the speech. they don't think about anything else and you are right. he said a lot harsher things than anyone talked about. this is including the absence of women on the stage on purpose. they even missed the dream part of the speech. they were looking so much for the violence that they did not see it. i'm wondering how they thought, with anyen there, notice that they've missed the story. >> i want to address media coverage on the march on washington and i remember the three major networks were there. withoutered it interruption and they broadcasted it to europe. "the washington post" assign more than 60 reporters to cover that story. it was really big news. a congressman, you said that the civil rights movement without the media would be like a bird without wings. what did you mean? >> i meant that. >> i know you did, but tell us what you meant. without the media, especially in the american south, without reporters, without the photographer, without the cameras to bring the message .nto the livi
anniversary of the march on washington. wasn't it exciting to see the enthusiasm and the film of the people of the day? who could have expected so many of us would be here who had ties to all that was owing on? who could suspect that we would all be with john lewis? [applause] attorney general, mr. mayor, you honor us with your presence. .he fierce urgency of now words rang out across the national mall, the call echoed in households across america. the summons ignited a movement to make real the promise of democracy. of course everyone knows the "i had a dream" speech, but the fierce urgency of now part of it was not only an inspiration, it was a motivation to act. was not the first time dr. martin luther king jr. urged fellow travelers to reject the status quo, to in his words at the march, refuse to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism. seven years early now to trim of in francisco, my hometown, 1956, dr. king delivered the same message to the delegates of the naacp convention. --said "now i realize those all over are telling us we must slow up, he said, but we cannot afford this slo
. >>> and 50 years after that historic march on washington, looking back at the dream and the dreamer. ♪ >>> diplomats are gathering in new york to discuss potential military intervention in syria. and un inspectors are continuing their investigation in a suburb of damascus. the chemical weapons attack happened one week ago today. david cameron has now called for meeting of the un security counsel permanent members. the security counsel has been debating action since it began more than two years ago, but so far no decisive action has been taken because of division among members of the counsel. the council consists of 15 members, of those five are permanent. they are the only nations with the power to veto the council's resolutions. joining us now for the late zest john terret. >> dell, i think you have to remember that the british have a parliamentary system. the executive sits in the chamber. it's a bit like having the white house in the house of representatives. so therefore there is a lot more pressure on the executives over there to make sure they do things legally. and i think
his vacation from the war room inside the war room and from washington, we also have mother jones magazine dark money reporter andy krohl. is this kind of hinge illegal, unethical, is it just a coincidence, bad judgment on booker's part, a combination of all of it. when i read this story, i thought that it was one of the most corrupt schemes to deliver personal money to a u.s. senate candidate that i've seen in a long time. what do you think? volunteer well, i think it raises a whole bunch of red flags about cory booker, and about how he interacts with the people who, you know, both people that he, who's interests he could be legislating or deciding on if he does become -- does he does go to congress, and also just issues about who funds his campaign. there are so may be murky overlaps here and ethical trip wires, if you will, about this whole, you know, you tube wanna-be venture that he is a part of. you also saw that the john of jeff zuker, the head of cnn, his 14-year-old son was on the board and had stock options for this company, as well. now i see the news coming out later t
at the washington monument. marking 50 years since hundreds of thousands of americans descend order the national mall to hear the reverend dr. martin luther king deliver one of the most famous speeches in american history. some of the thousands in washington were actually there on august 28, 1963. as we take a look at the scenes from 50 years ago and many on hand today who weren't even born yet. all celebrating the great strides america has made on race since the darkest days of the civil rights era. and also acknowledging their there is much more that can and must be done. we will go live to the washington monument in just a few minutes. we begin with a fox news alert out of our nation's capital where president obama has been holding a meeting that could have phonily major implication as he and his national security team discuss reports of a chemical weapons attack in syria. and at an investigation that could soon lead to some kind of u.s. military response. hello. i'm kelly wright. welcome to a brand new hour of "america's news headquarters." >> i'm heather chillders. u.n. investigators arrive
washington post" company agreed monday to sell its flagship newspaper to amazon.com founder and chief executive jeffrey these those. ownership of the paper after four generations. next week at back at former "washington post" owner the late katharine graham discussing her biography, personal history. c-span: author personal history did your children learn anything from this book about you? >> guest: that's a hard question. i'm sure they probably did but i couldn't tell you exact a wife. c-span: all of the stuff in here about your early life and your husband about that, did you talk that out? >> guest: yes, i think they understand that he was ill. the oldest one was 20 and the youngest one was 11 so they had to deal with it then and always. c-span: the question i had after i read the book was why do you want us to know all of this? >> guest: i really don't suppose that i meant to tell everything to everybody but once i sat down to write my story i just tend to be frank and open and i wanted to be very truthful and i wrote it the way i saw it. i told it the best i could. c-span: when di
nbc news in washington, the world's longest-running television show, this is "meet the press." >> good sunday morning. thousands of people gathered here in washington saturday to re-create the march on washington where dr. king gave his famous "i have a dream" speech. and it was exactly 50 years ago today, august 25th, 1963, that dr. king and the executive secretary of the naacp, roy wilkins, appeared right here on "meet the press." many of you either already had the chance or will have the opportunity to see that special program as we have made it -- the original broadcast available to our nbc stations across the country. our roundtable joins us in just a moment. but first joining me now, the only living speaker from the march on washington, congressman john lewis. he spoke yesterday in front of the lincoln memorial. >> you cannot stand by. you cannot sit down. you've got to stand up, speak up, speak out, and get in the way, make some noise! >> congressman lewis, welcome back to "meet the press." >> thank you very much, david, for having me. >> what a moment. we actually have the two
on washington ahead of the 50th anniversary of reverend dr. martin luther king jr.'s "i have a dream" speech. we're live at the national mall. >> we were up all night every night just wondering if it's going to come across the line and come toward us. >> home owners on edge as a massive wildfire burns out of control in yosemite national park. the latest on the efforts to beat back the flames. >> and the nsa getting a big endorsement after months of controversy over surveillance programs. we'll tell you who is now defending the embattled agency. >> we begin with a fox news alert out of our nation's capital, president obama holding an emergency meeting today with his national security team. it happened early this morning. on the disturbing reports of a chemical weapons attack in syria and while a u.s. military response is still anything but certain, there are already indications we may be prepared more than ever. to take steps if the president deems it necessary. we go live to washington for more on this. >> reporter: hi, greg. the navy has sent a fourth warship armed with ballistic missiles into
the march on washington ahead of the 50th anniversary of reverend dr. martin luther king jr.'s "i have a dream" speech. we're live at the national mall. >> we were up all night every night just wondering if it's going to come across the line and come toward us. >> home owners on edge as a massive wildfire burns out of control in yosemite national park. the latest on the efforts to beat back the flames. >> and the nsa getting a big endorsement after months of controversy over surveillance programs. we'll tell you who is now defending the embattled agency. >> we begin with a fox news alert out of our nation's capital, president obama holding an emergency meeting today with his national security team. it happened early this morning. on the disturbing reports of a chemical weapons attack in syria and while a u.s. military response is still anything but certain, there are already indications we may be prepared more than ever. to take steps if the president deems it necessary. we go live to washington for more on this. >> reporter: hi, greg. the navy has sent a fourth warship armed with ball
leaking from that plant. >>> and legalized pot in washington is turning into a very big business. how everyone from pot growers and sellers to the state government are reaping the rewards. >> fire officials in idaho say they have turned the dyed against the wildfire near sun valley. they cleared the way for hundreds of people in that area to return home meanwhile, across the western u.s. thousands of firefighters are working to bring 50 other wildfires under control. at this point the fires have been contained in colorado bringing the total number of states involved to ten. we have more with what they're up against. >> it's dawn, and just 37 degrees. some 240 men and women are preparing for another day on the fire line. grabbing a quick coffee and breakfast before the morning briefing. cole is the person in charge here. he's the branch director of the fire, the number one firefighting priority in the country. his job description, employ the troops, keep them safe and try to beat the fire. >> to be able to come out ahead of this. it's weakened, and we have a chance to go after it. >> s
anniversary of a water shed moment in our nation's history, here is a picture now from washington, dc, and you can see oprah is speaking at this very moment and it is raining because you can see the umbrellas. president obama and civil rights activists can demands are gathering at the lincoln memorial mark, the 1963 march on washington led by dr. martin luther king jr. early today, leap rhymes sang "amazing grace." ♪ amazing grace ♪ how sweet the sound jamie foxx and al sharpton also spoke this morning. >> abc7 news is joined by our reporter in washington, dc. >> good morning, that is oprah winfrey talking behind me and it is a tall order to try to speak as she is speaking but right now you can see that the people have all their eyes on oprah. it seems like this maybe was a little bit slow to get going but it is very humid here and this has been a lot of rain and people have to go through security checkpoints in order to come out here but, now, this is a crowd that is excited and eagerly awaiting remarks from president obama. it is impossible to miss the symbolism of the nation's first bla
know, with iraq and the attacks on the terrorist targets. it's the way washington is unfortunately. that those leaks come out. i guess it's part and parcel of the way our open government works and the nature of what happened in d.c. >> thank you, general, for joining us this morning. in our next hour we'll talk about the u.s. options in syria with the chairman of the senate foreign relations committee. senator men nen doesendez will join us. >>> a military jury needed just two hours yesterday to decide on a death sentence for major hasan, the ft. hood gunman. he admitted killing 13 people and did not defend himself at his trial. he said he acted to protect islamic fighters overseas. he will be the first american soldier to be executed in more than 50 years. >>> firefighters in california's syriaear sierra nevada are gaining ground this morning on the rim fire in yosemite national park. video shows just how big this fire is. yesterday, the flames forced park officials to close the main entrance on yosemite's east side. the fire is now 30% contained this morning.
. "washington journal" is next. ♪ good morning. august 12, 20 13. attorney general eric holder is set to announce that low-level, nonviolent drug offenders will no longer be charged minimum mandatory sentence -- sentences. it is part of an overall package to reform american prisons. he will make the remarks at the american bar association today in san francisco. we want to begin there. what is your take on the attorney general's proposal to reform the prison system in this country? republicans -- democrats -- independents -- you can send us a tweet if you go to twitter.com @cspanwj. on our facebook page, facebook.com/c-span. or e-mail us. we will begin with the front page of the "washington post" -- this is what the attorney general is going to propose, that low-level, nonviolent drug offenders with no ties to gangs or large-scale drug organizations will no longer be charged with offenses that impose severe mandatory sentences. it goes on to say it goes on to say we want to get your thoughts on this. what do you think about the attorney general setting this forward? this is his goal.
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,309 (some duplicates have been removed)

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